Man Salad & Chenin Blanc

ManSalad

Heavy clouds but no snow may be the weather story of the season for this dreary Eastern Tennessee “winter.” We can’t spring ahead but we can start dreaming of April. This healthy, but slightly heartier, salad carries some extra oomph with olive oil marinated portabella mushrooms, sweeter red bells and protein-rich eggs.

Although, this salad will keep you fuller for longer, you’ll still want to look for a lighter white wine to avoid overshadowing the delicate nature of greens. Anything from the Loire Valley like a Sancere, Vouvray or even Muscadet will do fine. I went with the American version of Vouvray and got a classic California Chenin Blanc.

Perhaps the flagship white in their collection, Pine Ridge Vineyards is well-known for their Chenin Blanc- Viognier blend. Lots of stone fruit flavors and crisp apple aromas surround this clean-finishing white. Its fresh and versatile nature is ideal for salads and day dreaming of not-too-far-off Spring evenings.

Pine Ridge Chenin

Loire Valley offers light and lively whites

American exploration of the French wine world is often limited by the internationally touted giants of Bordeaux, Burgundy and, increasingly, the Rhone Valley. Considering the historical achievement of their vineyards, there is little astonishment that other areas of France have not been able to break through in producing equally appreciated still-wines. That premise has been challenged as of late by the ever-increasing attraction and lure of white wines from France’s Loire Valley.

The Loire River, France’s longest, may not measure up in length to the African Nile, but it quite possibly holds the cradle of white wine sophistication within its shallow valleys. From coastal growing districts like Muscadet to the inland villages of Vouvray and Sancerre, the Loire River Valley produces some of the best whites in all of France, if not that of the entire Western European seaboard.

If one were to begin a wine journey from the Atlantic port city of Nantes and follow the Loire River eastward into France, the likelihood of first encountering a wine called Melon de Bourgogne would be high. Melon de Bourgogne is the signature grape of Muscadet and what the locals drink for white wines. Naturally paired with the offerings of the great sea, a Muscadet, by many standards, is a simpleton compared to a bossy California Chardonnay. However, what it lacks in pretention is easily made up for by its amiable way of complimenting both the local sea-fare and the easy-breezy, cultural and climatic environment of its residents. If you are looking for the best that Muscadet has to offer, then look for those from S<0x00E8>vre et Maine. Three of my favorite Muscadet’s are the Domaine de la Quilla, the Harmonie by Michel Delhommeau and the Sauvion.

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